Isle of Wight: monitoring seaweed with drones

On Monday the 23rd of April, we ventured out to the Isle of Wight. Also known as “Dinosaur Island”, it is famous for its dinosaur fossils and beautiful coasts. It is less known, however, for the rich seaweed communities which surround the island. Many people may grumble, turn around and leave once they find out … Continue reading Isle of Wight: monitoring seaweed with drones

What’s the best way to monitor kelp? The fun/efficiency trade-off

Kelp occupies the subtidal of our shores. In coastal ecosystems, kelp form habitats, providing food and a home for countless species. Their importance in coastal ecosystems is great, as is their commercial value to harvesters. HOWEVER, kelps face a wide range of pressures from harvesting to invasive species and climate change. Rising sea surface temperature (SST) … Continue reading What’s the best way to monitor kelp? The fun/efficiency trade-off

Remote sensing of kelp: novel methods for mapping and monitoring wild kelp resources

The executive summary from a report for The Crown Estate, piloting novel methods for mapping and monitoring kelp resources in the northeast Atlantic. Executive summary Kelp (Laminariales) are large brown, habitat-forming macroalgal (seaweed) species. Their large biogenic structure and ‘forest-like’ nature provide nursery and feeding grounds for a rich diversity of associated flora and fauna, … Continue reading Remote sensing of kelp: novel methods for mapping and monitoring wild kelp resources

Population genetics of the calcifying algae, Corallina officinalis

In 2017 Teresa Vale conducted a master’s research project using SNP markers to analyse population genetic patterns of Corallina officinalis in the Northeast Atlantic. This is a follow-up to this previous project. Abstract Calcifying macroalgae are an integral part of marine communities but they are significantly vulnerable to ocean acidification caused by an increased uptake of … Continue reading Population genetics of the calcifying algae, Corallina officinalis

Taking to Lulworth Cove like a duck to water

Our team, hailing from the Natural History Museum (NHM), Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and University of Bristol, recently took a trip to Lulworth Cove, Dorset on a filming and data gathering mission. The aim of the trip was two-part, to build on existing information for our on-going kelp monitoring project and … Continue reading Taking to Lulworth Cove like a duck to water

The effects of past, present and future climate change on the red algae Corallina officinalis within the North Atlantic

In 2016 Amy Jackson conducted a master's research project testing SNP markers to analyse population genetic patterns of Corallina officinalis. Abstract Anthropogenically driven climate change is projected to influence a vast number of species. Of particular concern to oceanic acidification and ocean warming are the red calcifying macroalgae, Corallina officinalis. Due their vulnerability to climate change … Continue reading The effects of past, present and future climate change on the red algae Corallina officinalis within the North Atlantic

Quantifying intertidal macroalgae abundance using aerial photography on the Isle of Wight

In 2015 Thomas Bell conducted a master's research project examining the use of remote sensing data to monitor change in seaweed habitat. Highlights Adapted pre-existing public RGB photographic record for new purpose SVM modelling able to separate different habitat classes using RGB DN values Isle of Wight intertidal macroalgae abundance has increased in the 21st century … Continue reading Quantifying intertidal macroalgae abundance using aerial photography on the Isle of Wight